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M.I.S.S. NYFW: Z Spoke by Zac Posen Fall 2011 Ready-to-Wear Collection

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M.I.S.S. NYFW: Z Spoke by Zac Posen Fall 2011 Ready-to-Wear Collection


Z Spoke by Zac Posen Fall 2011 Ready-to-Wear Collection
Yesterday, images of the Z Spoke by Zac Posen Fall 2011 Ready-to-Wear collection were released to the fashion hungry public during New York Fashion Week. The look book was beautifully shot in the Zac Posen studio and features some of Zac Posen’s muses Tao Okomoto, Anna Cleveland, Sessilee Lopez, Crystal Renn and Coco Rocha.

Zac Posen’s third collection for Z Spoke is a departure from his debut collection for the line. Whereas his first collection featured bright colors, bold patterns and was an exciting introduction to the media and public, his Fall 2011 collection is an homage to the Zac Posen girl. All of the pieces are extremely wearable and can be mixed and matched in a multitude of ways to create a variety of looks. Of course, there are plenty of Posen’s ladylike dresses to choose from but the line consists mostly of separates because well – that’s what people wear day to day.

The pieces included 1970s inspired secretary blouses (huge this season!), skirts, high waisted pants (also huge this season), corseted dresses, cotton burn-out t-shirts, and architectural jackets and dresses. The collection would not be complete without a gown as Zac Posen knows just what a girl need for a big night out. My favorites included a black Lamé dress with a deep V in the front (and back to match), a grey wool dress featuring Posen’s signature stitching, a brown wool coat with a strong rounded shoulder and silk pants that looked incredibly comfortable and chic at the same time. I basically wanted everything.

The Z Spoke is sophisticated and modern perfect for women who are CEOs to ladies going on their first job interview – and everything in between. Zac Posen has a remarkable ability to just know what looks good on a woman’s figure. And, he also knows what feels good against her skin. The collection features luxury wools, sultry silks, and soft knits in a gorgeous array of colors like atlantic blue (navy-ish), bougainvillea pink (fuchsia), slate (charcoal grey). The line also includes stretch cottons and jersey which are comfortable and perfect for throwing in a suitcase at a moment’s notice. My favorite fabrication was the stretch core suiting – a fabric with a bit of stretch but with a heavy enough weight to keep you sucked in – in all the right places. It was nice to see an unexpected fabric in feminine silhouettes like a corseted dress and pencil skirt.

The Spring 2011 line is exclusively at Saks but the Fall 2011 collection will have an expanded distribution and can be purchased at Saks, Bloomingdales, Neiman Marcus, Intermix and Scoop, among others. The price point ranges from $75 to $595 – a steal for getting to wear something created by Zac Posen!

Update: View images of the handbag collection and studio visit.

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Vogue Africa Denied by Conde Nast

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Vogue Africa Denied by Conde Nast


Vogue Africa Denied by Conde Nast

Vogue Africa Denied by Conde Nast

For a continent that is often grossly misrepresented in the mainstream media, fashion publications included, a chance to change the way that the rest of the world view’s their shared culture and contributions would have been mind altering to say the least. However, with Condé Nast denying Cameroonian photographer Mario Epanya’s proposal to develop an African edition of Vogue, the culturally diverse continent once again is relegated to safari spreads and pleas for aid.

Condé Nast has yet to comment on why, with 18 editions of the magazine published and distributed from India to Australia, Vogue Africa did not fit their criteria for licensing the Vogue name and likeness.  Speculators have alleged everything from the more pressing issues plaguing the people of Africa to the logistics of distributing a publication to 1 billion people in over 2,00 different languages. The most disturbing reason being cited has to do with the lack of diversity in the mainstream fashion media.

After Vogue Italia’s Black issue way back in 2008 and the recent calls for more realistic models, Condé Nast had no problem with Vogue Italia launching Vogue Black and Vogue Curvy sections of their website-all in perfect English by the way-to satisfy the masses calling for diversity. The problem with both of these sites is that, as we Americans learned over 50 years ago, separate is not always equal. By segregating these populations into their own online editions, we are in fact placing a band-aid on an issue that need to be remedied not covered. Instead of focusing on featuring more girls who look like Sessilee Lopez and Crystal Renn on the pages of Vogue-did you notice its always Vogue Italia attempting to display more diversity-we push these girls into their own site on away from the mainstream. I didn’t know Vogue Black existed until recently, and as an African-American woman I was appalled to find a site where Tyra Banks interviews people and stories on stereotypical Black issues are featured-FYI there is already a Vogue Black in print, it’s called Essence. Again, the issue with this is not the clichéd images of women sporting natural hair and Black models smiling backstage, the problem is that there needs to be equal representation on the pages of mainstream outlets to remedy the diversity issue.

Getting back to Vogue Africa, without a definite statement from Condé Nast all we can do is speculate as to why they passed on the opportunity to showcase such a culturally rich continent in a positive light. All too often Africa is still portrayed as a war-torn land of savages ravaged with infectious epidemics, the fact that there are areas of affluence, a rich tradition in textiles and the arts dating back centuries before the founding of America, a diverse array of cultures and traditions, is often left out when mainstream media attempts to define the entire continent with brief snippets from a few countries. Hopefully with this story burning up the blogs, Condé Nast will at least look into expanding the Vogue brand to Africa not only in an effort to inject more diversity into the fashion periodical section at Barnes and Nobles but to also show more of the world the truth about Africa, which is not a country despite that popular misconception.

Vogue Africa Denied by Conde Nast

Vogue Africa Denied by Conde Nast

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